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VINFORUM

Brouilly 2009 5 (5) STARS /Great Purchase (80 points)
Fresh and attractive. Good developed with hint of dark berries, spices and a little flower and leather in the aroma. Good body with attractive soft fruit. Nice acidity and long elegant finish. Rich and structured to be a Beaujolais.

CuvéeVolaine 2009 5 (5)  STARS /Great Purchase (77points)
Fresh and typical Gamay character. Developed Beaujolais with hints of dark berries and flowers in the aroma. Beautiful body with great clean fruit. Nice  acidity and firm finish. Rich and structured to be a Beaujolais.


06.06.2012

58ème concours des grands Vins de France

Macon, médaille de bronze Moulin à vent, Domaine de la Fond Moiroux[more]


31.03.2012

Participation aux sélections de FLAVOURS FROM FRANCE

Participation aux sélections de FLAVOURS FROM FRANCE. Le comité de dégustation était composé des représentants de Flavours From France (Christophe Lagrange et moi-même), de Sommeliers et de Professionnels. Les dégustations ont...[more]


01.03.2012

Domaine de la Fond Moiroux: European sales will start with partner Wine Logistix GmbH

Cogny/France|Langgöns/Germany, in March 2012: The distribution of the wines of Domaine de la Fond Moiroux is expanding to Europe. Due to the cooperation with Germany-based IT distribution company Wine Logistix GmbH Bernd...[more]


16.01.2012

Silver and Bronze Medal

Brouilly 2010 Silver Medal Moulin a Vent 2009 Bronze Medal Singapore[more]


16.01.2012

Konkurs Winiarski o Medal 2011

see the certificate here[more]


30.11.2011

1001degustations.com

3 diplomas for Fondmoiroux from Internet guide[more]


30.11.2011

Bring Beaujolais wine to your dim sum table

INTEGRATING Western wines into Chinese dining culture is a challenging, yet often rewarding, experience. Dim sum is more than just a meal; it's a communal and social event. More varied and interesting than the traditional...[more]


29.10.2011

French Wine Seminar 2011

Sharpening your Competitive Advantage in French Wines Seminar organised by Singapore Polytechnic in conjunction with Wine For Asia 2011... read more  [more]


26.10.2011

Wine Style Asia Award 2011

Congratulations to the Award Winner of the Wine Style Asia Award 2011! Our "BROUILLY 2010" DOMAINE DE LA FOND MOIROUX is awarded a SILVER Medal which will be announced at WSAA 2011 Gala Dinner & Award Presentation Ceremony...[more]


01.09.2011

Wine tasting menu

2011 Wine tasting with fine Beaujolais wine from Domaine de la Fond Moiroux, Cogny, Beaujolais, France[more]


01.09.2011

More about China Wine Awards

The China Wine Awards (CWA) 2011 held on 1 September 2011 at The Mira Hong Kong was the BIGGEST international wine competition ever held in Greater China. Already, the CWA has attracted enormous media attention, including being...[more]


31.08.2011

Flyer Prowein

Domaine Fond Moiroux was founded in 1789. The estate is located in the village of Cogny in south Beaujolais. This zone is known as the “land of the golden stones” due to the color of the omni- present sandstone ...read more[more]


Gold Medal Brouilly 2009

We are proud about the gold medal for our Brouilly 2009.  [more]


 

On 30 August 2017, a group of sommeliers gathered at Freek’s Mill in Brooklyn

On 30 August 2017, a group of sommeliers gathered at Freek’s Mill in Brooklyn, New York for a technical tasting of a range of cru Beaujolais. The wines were produced by a collective of twelve producers known as the Club Export Cru Beaujolais.

The sommelier panel was comprised of the following tasters:

-        Alex Alan, Owner and Wine Director, Freek’s Mill (NYC);

-        Arthur Hon, Wine Director, Sepia and Proxi (Chicago)

-        Caleb Ganzer, Owner and Wine Director, La Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels (NYC); and

-        Taylor Parsons, Owner, Whole Cluster Beverage & Hospitality Consulting (Los Angeles).

Principally, the sommeliers were tasked with providing analytical, qualitative evaluations of the

producers’ wines. Secondarily, and more broadly, they were asked to offer insights into how best to

position the wines—and cru Beaujolais in general—to the US market.

The panel was impressed by the overall quality of the wines, and saw clear opportunities for bringing them to various market segments. Not all were created equal: some were ideally-suited to boutique restaurant programs and small retailers, perhaps, while others seemed more appropriate (in both style and in production scale) for larger outlets.

On the whole, the tasting provided an excellent window into the range of styles offered by the next wave of cru Beaujolais imports, and catalyzed a productive discussion on how best to present the region as a whole to both US consumers as well as the sommeliers and other wine professionals who serve them.

 

INTRODUCTION

On 30 August 2017, a group of sommeliers gathered at Freek’s Mill in Brooklyn, New York for a technical tasting of a range of cru Beaujolais. The wines were produced by a collective of twelve producers known as the Club Export Cru Beaujolais.

The sommelier panel was comprised of the following tasters:

-        Alex Alan, Owner and Wine Director, Freek’s Mill (NYC);

-        Arthur Hon, Wine Director, Sepia and Proxi (Chicago)

-        Caleb Ganzer, Owner and Wine Director, La Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels (NYC); and

-        Taylor Parsons, Owner, Whole Cluster Beverage & Hospitality Consulting (Los Angeles).

Principally, the sommeliers were tasked with providing analytical, qualitative evaluations of the

producers’ wines. Secondarily, and more broadly, they were asked to offer insights into how best to

position the wines—and cru Beaujolais in general—to the US market.

The panel was impressed by the overall quality of the wines, and saw clear opportunities for bringing them to various market segments. Not all were created equal: some were ideally-suited to boutique restaurant programs and small retailers, perhaps, while others seemed more appropriate (in both style and in production scale) for larger outlets.

On the whole, the tasting provided an excellent window into the range of styles offered by the next wave of cru Beaujolais imports, and catalyzed a productive discussion on how best to present the region as a whole to both US consumers as well as the sommeliers and other wine professionals who serve them.

 

THE STATE OF PLAY

Cru Beaujolais & The American Consumer

In short, the good news is this: the wine market in the United States is ripe for additional depth in the Beaujolais category—particularly for the high-quality wines that cru Beaujolais can deliver. Several trends have conspired to create this opening, but a few are of particular note.

First and foremost, wine drinkers across the country are diversifying their wine consumption by looking to new regions and appellations, and particularly at imports. This trend has been accompanied by a demonstrable shift, especially among millennials, towards more balanced wines in lieu of those driven by concentration, alcohol and sheer power.

Secondarily, despite widely-documented and market-wide increases in premiumization, the precipitous price increases in the ‘marquee’ regions have fast-outpaced the resources of all but the deepest pockets. Top wines from Bordeaux, Burgundy, the Rhône and other regions both domestic and abroad have been out of reach, practically-speaking, for many years now, and the pace of the increases shows no sign of slowing.

Lastly, many consumers—and again, millennials in particular—have been looking with increasing focus for what might broadly be considered wines of origin: wines with stories, produced in defined

appellations by smaller (or at least non-industrial-scale) producers. This trend is most pronounced in major urban markets, but it is a totally reasonable expectation that it will extend deeper into the marketplace in the coming years.

Taken together, this shifting topography creates a genuine field of possibility for cru Beaujolais, as the category plays synergistically with many of the changes being observed. That said, it remains to be seen whether key markets are primed for consumer-facing efforts to differentiate the various crus from one another. After all, the vast majority of consumers can’t differentiate between different communes of Bordeaux or Burgundy, much less the climats of the latter. It’s likely a stretch to suppose that the tolerance or appetite for such specific information would be significantly different vis-à-vis

Beaujolais…for now, at least.

In the meantime—and in the absence of a deep-dive into the minutiae of terroir variations, exposures and micro-climates—the most effective informational strategy for consumers would be to focus on the stylistic spectrum of the region. More specifically, the technical choices made in the production of cru Beaujolais should be repackaged into easily-groupable styles, so that cru Beaujolais can be presented as a high-quality production area that produces a defined stylistic range stretching from bright, fruity wines (i.e. the fully-carbonic styles) to more structured, traditionally-vinified wines that are more texturally- akin to Burgundy.

 

Cru Beaujolais & The American Sommelier

While it remains an open question if key markets are prepared for a consumer-facing differentiation of crus within the larger Beaujolais zone, it is undeniable that cru Beaujolais is ascendant on the

professional side of the US wine industry. Indeed, it’s not an exaggeration to say that representation of some element of cru Beaujolais is at this point a key component of top-tier wine programs throughout the country. It isn’t hard to see why: the wines are delicious, generally easy to drink, linkable to detailed origin stories, and are available in a market context in which many of the (other) great wines of France are both scarce and exorbitantly-priced.

For sommeliers and buyers in those key markets, and perhaps even especially for those in emerging ones, there is no such thing as too much technical data. And that data should extend well beyond profiles of the crus.

Firstly, it is our opinion that trade-facing education on cru Beaujolais needs to begin with (and be based on) the options available to winemakers in the area at large, as it is a region with a particularly broad spectrum of winemaking approaches. Understanding the range of possibilities—as well as the available technology, the local traditions and the prevailing styles—can provide crucial context for evaluating the wines themselves, which can only help put the right bottles in the right hands.

Once this more robust and collectively-understood foundation is built, a real, deep conversation of the crus will have maximum impact, and providing a deep understanding of what makes each cru unique from the rest can only serve to create possibilities for the category as a whole.

Here again, the details matter. Differentiating the crus on every possible level—elevations, soil types, exposures, harvest dates, clonal variations, vine ages, etc.—and providing the clearest, most detailed information possible reduces the chance that buyers will conflate individual crus and paint the entire

area with a broad brush; creating distinction allows for fleshing-out Beaujolais selections with a range of crus, producers and vintages. In other words, drawing clear lines between the crus allows Beaujolais to further entrench itself as a broad, rich category, and one of which a little depth is necessary for even the most mildly-canonical of French wine programs.

Yet even in the most developed import markets (New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles), where basic knowledge of winemaking techniques might be relatively sophisticated, a common-denominator understanding of the respective typicity of each cru is still out of reach. Correspondingly (and again, assuming the market is primed to receive this kind of information), differentiating the crus in a detailed, systematic and digestible fashion could have a real impact. To that end, we would propose the breakdown found in the following section. It’s far from complete, but we believe it provides a good foundation from which to work towards a more common understanding.

 

Moulin-À-Vent

South-southeast of Chénas, on the 200-meter slopes above the town of Romanèche-Thorin, lie the vineyards of Moulin-à-Vent and the first of the famous appellations that arguably make up the heart of the cru zone. Like Juliénas, Moulin-à-Vent has only enjoyed official AOP status since the mid-1930s, but its wines were well-known even in antiquity. Today, it is a relatively large cru, spready over 600ha and counting nearly three hundred growers. It is undoubtedly the darkest, most masculine, tannic and age- worthy of all the crus, giving rise to its occasional moniker, ‘the King of Beaujolais’.

Partly, this is due to the prevailing style of the region, which favors a more Burgundian-style vinification with longer, traditional macerations. Yet also equally impactful are the region’s soils, which are composed primarily of pink granite bedrock—similar to what is found in Fleurie, Régnié and Chiroubles. In Moulin-à-Vent, however, these soils are suffused with quartz veining consisting of high levels of manganese and other rare metals; there is some as-yet-unproven speculation that this aspect of the terroir here contributes to the sturdy character of the wines.

The bands of manganese are also sometimes speculated to contribute to the expressive aromatic profile of the cru, which veers most often to clean flavors of dark plum and purple flowers such as violets. As the wines age, a dark, spicy, earthy character emerges behind the fruit and flowers, and over time the wines begin to take on a distinctly Pinot Noir-ish character. Indeed, this effect is so widespread and clear that the locals even have a verb for this subtle conversion: pinoter.

 

Moulin-à-Vent wines were especially good, particularly the downright lovely 2013. Solid winemaking here, clearly, but again, it would have been nice to taste a true vertical.

 

Wines Tasted from Moulin-à-Vent

Domaine Fond Moiroux, Moulin-à-Vent

2015

Domaine Fond Moiroux, Moulin-à-Vent

2013

 

Moulin-à-Vent                 2015

Tasters immediately noted the ‘intensity’ and ‘power’ present here, though most generally

preferred the ‘macerated red fruits’ and other ‘masculine’ aromatics to the ‘brooding’ and ‘top- heavy’ palate. For some, this was simply a sign of youth: ‘potentially a very good wine lurking here’. Two of four tasters said they would purchase.

 

Moulin-à-Vent                 2013

A universally-beloved wine. Tasters praised this as a ‘very good example’ of the appellation, with ‘oak-tinged’ red and purple fruits. The panel found it ‘balanced’, ‘complex’ and ‘serious’, with one noting that it was one of the strongest wines of the day. All tasters indicated an interest to purchase.

 

The Future is Bright

We are confident that the future is bright for cru Beaujolais. Response to the region’s wines is overwhelmingly positive in the US, among both professionals and consumers, and its popularity is only increasing. Indeed, it is no longer unusual to find surprisingly deep (and broad) listings of cru wines on restaurant wine lists and in retailers in major markets.

Now is the time to widen the scope of cru Beaujolais on offer in the US, and to design a marketing push to accompany it, but this effort must be done intelligently, with corresponding work done on the education front. Beyond increased sales and more skus, the ultimate goal in our opinion would be to see cru Beaujolais listed much like Burgundy or, as we are beginning to see of late, Champagne: multiple selections presented by commune and then, where possible, by climat.

All of this is certainly possible in the near-term, but only if buyers are equipped with the knowledge necessary to see the cru Beaujolais zone for the nuanced, incredibly diverse wine region that it is. The steps outlined here are, we believe, the way to do it.


Wine tasting during the visit of Mr. Noel Chi (1993 Brouilly, Moulin a Vent 2011, 2012, Pinot Noir 2015, Chardonnay 2014). Overall Enthusiasm

Visit of Mr Noel Chi

Our Beaujolais ambassador in China Chine, Mr Noel Chi, came to visit Fondmoiroux. Noel is the one who tastes Beaujolais wines for the trade in China (Wine fair, events, seminars…). He writes the articles on the Chinese application wechat.  Noel came with his wife. He speaks French and a little bit of English.


29.04.2013

Gilbert et Gaillard 2014

Dear friends of Fond Moiroux We would like to inform you about an important commentary for our wines. We are still trying to reach the point of 100% enjoyment and pleasure.[more]


09.06.2012

Hongkong winetasting dinner

Please feel free to view the pictures of our amazing dinner -- More pictures here  [more]


09.06.2012

Decanter World Wine Award

We are very proud to let you know about Domaine de la Fond Moiroux being awarded with a Bronze Medal at Decanter World Wine Award View award[more]


05.06.2012

China Wine Awards

"Volaine" Red Wine 2009 ... read more[more]


01.03.2012

Domaine de la Fond Moiroux and European sales partner Wine Logistix GmbH

Cogny/France|Langgöns/Germany, in March 2012: The distribution of the wines of Domaine de la Fond Moiroux is expanding to Europe. Due to the cooperation with Germany-based IT distribution company Wine Logistix GmbH Bernd...[more]


16.01.2012

Beaujolais 2010-2009 Bronze Winner

Bronze Winner 2011 - Hong Kong International Wine & Spirit Competition[more]


30.07.2011

What's so good about Beaujolais 2010

I recently enjoyed a dinner in Paris with the best-known wine writers in each of Australia and New Zealand. It was all very jolly even if, as you may imagine, study of the Aux Lyonnais wine list took up rather more time than it...[more]


26.04.2011

Silver medal 2011 for our "Volaine 2009"

National wine contest in MACON[more]


28.02.2011

Certified with 85 points

Brouilly AOC Brouilly 2009 got certified by "France 2011" see certificate[more]


"Wine Style Asia Award 2010"

Le Domaine de la Fond Moiroux received for his "Volaine 2009" a silver medal at "Wine Style Asia Award 2010".[more]


WSAA

Wine Style Asia Award (WSAA) has firmly established itself as a credible platform that accurately identifies wines best suited for the Asian market. Into its eighth edition... read more[more]


Wine is a natural product...

Wine is a natural product … and therefore so captivating. Every day, we spend time in tending our vineyards and producing grapes of outstanding quality. Mother Nature, however, is the great unknown in the equation: production –...[more]


Prowein Düsseldorf

Malcolm Tham from the organizing commitee "Wine for Asia Singapore" visiting last years award wining "Domaine de la Fond Moiroux" with somelier, friend Fernand Klee Luxembourg at Prowein Duesseldorf.[more]


China Wine Awards

"Volaine" Red Wine 2009 ... read more[more]


 
 

HKISF NOV 2010 (Hongkong)


2009 is a promising year! Light falls of rain in spring, a sunny and warm summer have produced very ripe grapes early September with a high sugar content.

We shall probably bottle “Beaujolais” and “Beaujolais-Village” in spring after the end of the ripening process. “Brouilly” and “Moulin A Vent” which are usually kept for 12 month in old wooden casks will be bottled in the course of the second half of the year.

In the meantime, we will supervise the ripening of our wines with great interest and care.

We will keep you informed of their development and, in due time, we will let you have our price list.

The BACHHAUSEN-CONRARDY Family

 
 
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